Dowsing Ethics, Part 2: What Not to Do!

NOTE: everything I report below could just as easily be applied to comments delivered by a psychic, spiritual healer, etc.

See earlier article, Dowsing Ethics – Above All Do No Harm

A real life example of what not to do!

In my first dowsing class (a week long course in 1990) some people were uncomfortable with a fellow classmate. They asked the teacher about it, and he responded that this individual had killed them in a past life. The students quickly spread this information to other students and even to those outside the class in an organization and local church to which they all belonged until many others both in and outside of the class were shunning this student.

The teacher’s irresponsible comment created an atmosphere of fear and distrust towards this person where before there had only been a vague feeling of unease from something they didn’t understand—unease that could have come from a host of multiple other factors including what was going on personally in her life that had nothing to do with the classmates whether in this life or any other.

The end result was that this individual’s reputation was ruined both in the group and the larger community on something that could neither be proved or disproved, money due her for hosting the event was withheld, and relationships and good will in the greater community were ruptured irreparably and permanently.

This incidence illustrates ethical violations to be avoided when dowsing. These ethical violations were caused by:

  • failure to remove ego, arrogance, spiritual pride, or personal agenda 
  • failure to consider a multitude of other factors potentially involved in the subject of investigation
  • failure to consider the limits of what we can, cannot or should not dowse upon
  • failure to consider that dowsing even among the most skillful is not 100% accurate, and that any particular dowsing results can be wrong
  • failure to consider the consequences of how others will interpret and do with the dowsing results reported
  • dowsing on what cannot be verified and which can have negative consequences.

The problem of dowsing what cannot be verified

On the one hand, dowsing can provide information, guidance, suggestions that are difficult, more time consuming, or impossible to obtain another way. But that does not mean that such information can be considered accurate until later proven with successful results or through testing by other means. Dowsing is an art gained slowly through training and mentorship, experience, and learning through your mistakes. It is not always right.

If acting on such information can have serious consequences, it should not be reported and no action should take place until it can be thoroughly researched and tested. While creative breakthroughs can occur on what starts out as a hunch, unverifiable dowsed information is speculation or theory until you prove it. Especially in the area of the area of personal relationships, reporting such unverifiable information is unethical, slanderous, and opens up the possibility of a lawsuit.

Dowsing past lives is frivolous entertainment. Dowsing issues is not.

I personally believe in past life, and consider that certain of my ‘memories’, talents and relationships stem from there. But I cannot prove it, nor think it important to do so. As a hypnotherapist, I have experienced, been trained in and guided many people through past life regressions. Nonetheless, I do not take past life scenarios seriously as they can only rarely be verified.

Nonetheless, past life regression is helpful in identifying issues even if the events reported are totally fictitious. The material can be metaphorically true and helpful providing it is understood as a metaphor or dream material by a mature, mentally and emotionally balanced client. It can be therapeutic in the hands of a skillful regressionist who uses the storyline to focus on healing the issues uncovered, and applying the positive learning to present life challenges. But in thinking of it as an actual, factually correct lifetime, it can be counterproductive. I found that not all clients are willing or able of doing the healing work, letting go of such stories and previous identities, and moving on. Consequently, I no longer conduct them. 

While dowsing charts can also pin-point past life cast and characters, I only rarely have used them for myself, but not for clients.

The real focus on dowsing should be on healing, improving or practical application for what is going on or needed now.  

If trauma has occurred, find the positive learning, the wisdom, and release all stuck emotions from things real or imagined. Locate and clear any limiting beliefs or judgments whether justified by the facts or not. This allows to work in a ‘can’t hurt’ way. Stick to healing issues, working towards solving practical problems, and being of service.

Keep dowsing focused on helping yourself and others in the life today.

If you are dowsing (or using any psychic art) out of curiosity rather than healing your own issues, solving practical problems, being of service to someone else, you are misusing it.

The problem of interpretation

In my example, the students accepted the teacher’s opinion that they had been killed by a classmate as accurate. After all, how are brand new students going to have the discipline to be neutral when dowsing such highly emotional material, and the experience to know when they are really tapping into universal consciousness and divine truth or not? Then they further assumed that the teacher’s words of having been “killed” to mean that they had been murdered. But were they? What were the circumstances around their untimely death if it happened because circumstances and motive makes all the difference even in a court of law as to guilt or not. 

People can be killed through multiple means—accident, ignorance, superstition, negligence, laziness, self-defense, misunderstanding, poor communication, mistaken identity, perceived wrongdoing, or set-up. Deliberately caused deaths can be authorized, ordered or sanctioned by the larger community as an act or casualty of war, in the service of cultural, political, ideological or religious beliefs, or because the individual himself committed some serious violation of a community rule.

My fellow students may have assumed that they did not participate, cause or bring upon themselves what may have happened to themselves. They may have assumed that they were blameless when they may actually have been criminals and sentenced to death by their group as punishment. 

Faulty interpretations

When I dowsed on the teacher’s pronouncement, my interpretation was different. I felt that the “killing” was not a physical death, but rather a psychological dismissal. In other words, this student did not respect or take these certain classmates seriously. She judged them as much too gullible and not exercising common sense — something borne out by their behavior. Perhaps, the students were feeling uncomfortable because they felt judged, but didn’t understand it. Or they may have been picking up bad vibes because this woman was going through both financial and marital trouble with her husband, who was also in the class!

Consider all the ramifications of what you say, how you say it, and to whom.

  • This teacher failed to consider the effect his comment would have on the class and on the accused student both inside and outside of class.
  • He had not considered the maturity and understanding of those to whom he was speaking.
  • He had not considered their awareness that in the context of multiple lifetimes, a soul is thought to swing between being victim and victimizer.
  • He had not considered that that these students, like most people, might think of themselves as the innocent victim in their interactions, and deny their own part in whatever happened to them, and the harm they have done (or wanted to) to others in any point in time.
  • He had not considered that no matter what anyone may have done in the past, each person has the ability to learn and turn their life around.
  • Nor had he considered that his students understood the underlying oneness of all humanity – that like it or not, we are all connected, all brothers on the same planet.

What this teacher should have done – an opportunity missed 

Besides the gross ethical violations, this teacher missed a precious opportunity to teach the entire class how to use dowsing to heal uncomfortable feelings and a relationship in the present moment. Healing always involves starting with healing the self. These students missed out from learning how to turn their stuck emotions into a blessing.

This is something of which I know much, and I will address in another post.

This topic will be taken up on the free American Society of Dowsers Dowsing Support and Continuing Education Teleconference, Tuesday, May 8, 2018 at 8 PM Eastern US. Call 641-715-0873 and enter participant code 335033. A recording will be available the next day for ASD members.

Copyright by Roxanne Louise. However, this article may be shared in other free online sources only if this copyright notice and link to http://www.roxannelouise.com and http://unlimitedpotentialhealingcenter.com  are included with the content. This is rewrite of a 2/21/16 blog article.

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