“Dowsing to Dump Bad Habits – Part 1”

I have been a creative problem solver all of my life. But since becoming a hypnotherapist in 1989, I have been helping people professionally to get rid of smoking, overeating, procrastination, and a host of bad habits as well as detrimental mental and emotional patterns. In 1990, I added dowsing to my hypnosis, counseling and other skills for a comprehensive approach to dumping bad habits. 

Because I understood the dynamics of smoking and addiction in general, I created dowsing charts for typical conscious reasons why people started smoking as well as both the conscious and unconscious reasons that keep the habit/addiction alive. I then created charts and checklists on interventions, visualizations, modalities, and strategies that would most likely work with any individual client. I made dowsing charts on secondary gain (a benefit obtained from a problem), defense mechanisms, coping skills, emotions, beliefs, judgments, and much more. These charts eventually became the book, Therapeutic Dowsing and Telepathic Healing.

dowsing cover frontAs I studied all the reasons for overweight and what to do about them, I created dowsing charts for the physical reasons for weight gain and difficulties in losing. I had other charts for the emotional and psychological reasons for weight including the reasons why people binge or eat when they are not hungry. And I had many charts on various traumas, issues, and typical life events as well as the people and ages at which they may have originated.

 

 

The most important parts of getting rid of any problem behavior are:

  • A decision and commitment

Nothing happens until you do this.

  • Having a big enough reason—your why. 

What’s the downside if you don’t change? Be very clear about this. Then you can dowse the key issue/s. 

What’s the upside if you do? Clarify this as well. Dowse out the most important.

What do you want more than ___ (the cigarette, ice cream/potato chips, beer, etc.)?This is all part of your clarity of purpose. 

Anthony Robbins says that all motivation is carrot and stick. A donkey can be motivated to move forward if he wants to get the carrot held in front of him, or he can move because someone is hitting him on the rump with a stick and it hurts enough. 

Do you go to work because you love your job and can’t wait to get there? Or do you grudgingly get out of a warm, comfortable bed because you don’t want to be fired and end up homeless?

Increase the appeal of moving forward to make the change, as well as increasing the distaste for the negative ramifications of not doing so.

  • Clearing, healing, resolving any resistance to change

Dowse out the percentage of resistance to getting rid of the bad habit. Perhaps your unconscious mind thinks it is helping you in some way by maintaining it. If so, use dowsing, EFT, or hypnosis to re-educate the unconscious of a constructive way to achieve the higher intention, and to agree to release the negative habit.

  • Increasing the allowance, even excitement for change

Dowse out this percentage as well. Then ask if you can increase it to the highest level possible at this time, and do so.

  • Knowledge of the issue at hand

Do some research on the habit you want to change. Then you can design your own dowsing checklists/charts. For example, overeating can be triggered by food cravings stemming from allergies, metabolic issues, fungal overgrowth, as well as psychological or emotional issues, particularly anger and guilt. If physical causes elicit a positive dowsing response, it would make sense to consult a physician. 

Smoking can start as a desire to be grown-up, rebel against authority, seek acceptance by the ‘in crowd’. Unconsciously the person is still the kid trying to fulfill those original desires. List the possible reasons and dowse out what is relevant to you.

Knowing that addictions are filling a void will help you to look for what it is that is trying to be filled and address that. Is there an emotional or psychological wound that has to be healed? Dowse.

  • Substitution of a positive or constructive alternative

What are you going to do instead? 

Understanding that overeating, taking drugs or alcohol, and smoking are coping strategies for many emotional states (boredom, loneliness, upset, depression), will make you aware of the need to learn healthy ways of coping with stress and emotional lows. 

  • A well designed strategy. 

Again by doing research on what has helped others will allow you to design your own program. List the possibilities and dowse out what will work for you. Having a buddy or someone to whom you place yourself accountable is helpful. Do a 30 day challenge with a friend.

  • Focus

This is needed to stay on track as it takes time of consciously doing things in the new way until it becomes routine and comfortable. But be aware that if you slouch off, the old behavior will resurface. Ask any person who despite years of not smoking picked up one cigarette as to just how quickly they reverted to full scale smoking habit again. Any habit that is also an addiction (smoking, drinking, gambling, etc) must be totally permanently eliminated.

  • Consistent action

The desired habit must be maintained through frequent, repeated action or it will not become internalized and automatic. The more you repeat the behavior, the stronger it becomes. The less you repeat it, the weaker.

So if I want set a new habit of cleaning the kitchen every night before bed, I have to make a point to do it, tired or not. I tell myself how little time it will take, and how good it will feel to wake up to a clean kitchen. It also helps to check it off on a calendar. I write down my goals and accomplishments for each day. Noting what I have done, even if many things on my list did not get done, is a reward in itself. Noting what I didn’t do creates greater urgency to do it the next day. I focus on making progress to avoid getting discouraged.

  • A positive attitude and belief in one’s ability to succeed. 

If you don’t think it is possible, you won’t even try. This is what stops more smokers from quitting – they tell themselves they ‘can’t quit’. You will also need a positive attitude to deal with setbacks, challenges, delays, etc.

If you find yourself with a negative mindset, you can dowse, do EFT, or hypnosis to counter it. Hold a strong intention to let the negative belief go, and the belief you want to hold instead. “I release any belief, perception or judgment that ___ (negative belief). I now choose to believe that ___ (list at least 3 strong beliefs).”

WANT MORE INFORMATION?

Central Virginia Dowsers Meeting, Sunday, March 10 at 1:15 PM.

At our next CVD Meeting in Charlottesville, Virginia, Roxanne Louise will teach you how to use dowsing to succeed in dumping bad habits and installing good ones instead. Contact us for further information at 434-263-4337 or email at roxannelouise2@gmail.com.

American Society of Dowsers is holding a free teleconference, on Tuesday, April 9, at 8 PM Eastern (US). Roxanne Louise will be discussing this topic of Dowsing on Habits with Margaret VanLaanMartin

Want to Learn Pendulum Dowsing?

I will be teaching an all day Pendulum Workshop for Hypnotherapists, Monday, April 29. at the HEARTLAND HYPNOSIS CONFERENCE in St. Louis, MO See here :  Therapeutic Dowsing & Telepathic Healing  

Copyright 2/28/19 by Roxanne Louise. However, this article may be shared in free online sources only if this copyright notice and link to http://www.roxannelouise.com and http://unlimitedpotentialhealingcenter.com  are included with the content.  

The LIMITS OF MIND TO CREATE YOUR REALITY

dolores-3-e1355459003189-219x300[1]Yesterday, as I was fighting off some ‘bug’ and just trying to rest,  I listened to a video of Dolores Cannon yesterday saying that “ILLNESS IS SOMETHING YOU BRING ON YOURSELF”.
 
While Dolores made absolutely no mention of the many factors you can control that do effect your health, I certainly believe that stress, bad habits, unresolved issues, and sometimes secondary gain, all play a major part in weakening the body’s system and even can determine where and when person gets ill (see work of Dr. Ryke Geerd Hamer, M.D.,German New Medicine). This means that an individual has a lot they can do to be and remain healthy. I have written many blog articles of this at length. (Particularly, see “What if illness was sometimes a choice?”)
However, she makes no mention of the multitude of factors over which you have no control: your dna, the health and nutrition of your ancestors, your mother’s nutrition during her pregnancy with you, how well you were fed as a child, the economics and the political instability of the times. What about the cleanliness of the food, water, air, or whether or not your home had lead paint, or whether you were exposed to multiple toxins, high stress levels in the home and larger community?  
Dolores like Dr. Michael Newton, author of Life Between Lives, also believes that you pick your parents in pre-birth planning session. But if that theory is true, (and I think you should consider that it is just that–a theory not fact), I don’t think you can take that to mean that you signed up for every inherited body weakness, potential disease, and possible element that could impinge upon your health over your lifetime. 
 
I am picking on my hypnosis colleague Dolores whom I both knew and heard speak live many times at conferences, because she like many in the New Age community that are enamored of the Law of Attraction, and the power of our mind and emotion to create your reality, gives the impression of ignoring those limits and forces beyond our control. Just because she has justly received acknowledgement for her work in hypnotizing hundreds of people and therefore, we should consider her conclusions drawn as a result, does not mean that we cannot point out holes in her theories. In fact, the more prominent a leader in the field, the more their ideas should be scrutinized lest we give away any power of discernment and slavishly bow to hero worship.

Difficulty in making definitive conclusions from client work

Here lies some potential reasons for skewing of results that can falsify conclusions arising from client work.
I have noticed that those people that come to me for client work do so because on some level, consciously or unconsciously, they believe that I can help them. In other words, the client self-selects their therapist.

 

A client with a very different background, belief system or model of reality from the therapist would probably go to someone else, and that therapist would probably reach different conclusions. If at any time that therapist’s model of reality is revealed and is in conflict with that of the client, rapport is lost and the client probably would stop going to that therapist.

The expectations of the hypnotist are more likely to affect the material revealed by the client precisely because in the hypnotized state they are in rapport with the therapist and highly suggestible. 

Limits to mental causation of reality

We cannot ignore the ultimate parameter of existence here on earth, which is that death comes to us all – even to the ones that take vitamins, think positive, meditate, and work on their issues. I do not mean to be harsh to point out that Dolores is now dead. So are Dr. Hamer, saints, monks, athletes, healers, health food advocates, and the most prominent of positive thinkers: Wayne Dwyer, Norman Vincent Peale,  and Robert H. Schuller. 
Yes, I most certainly believe that is important to take responsibility for what happens to us by acknowledging any possible role we may have played in it’s creation, and in whatever choices we make to take appropriate action accordingly. It moves us away from being a victim. 
What has repeatedly annoyed me with Dolores (and others) despite her doing a voluminous body of interesting and otherwise good work, is going into the opposite extreme in the orthodoxy of New Thought . It is not just uncharitable, it is false.

Finding Your Why!

The end of December and beginning of January are traditional times to reflect on the year past and set goals for the year ahead. People think about getting rid of bad habits and accomplishing a long list of things that they have never been able to do before. Yet unless they do something different, it is likely that these goals will not get done this year either.

New Year’s Resolutions tend to wither on the vine before February rolls around. Setting goals, making ‘to do’ lists, and having the best of intentions are simply not good enough. You have to have a big enough reason, a reason to get off the couch, a reason to do a bunch of things you don’t like or are outside of your comfort zone especially when you are tired, stressed, or there is a good movie on Netflix. This is what I call finding your ‘why’. 

Why New Year’s Resolutions and Goals Fail

In an earlier blog article “When Goals Lack Luster”I addressed part of why people do not achieve what they would like. Here they are:

  1. The goals are not really your goals. They sound good but really belong to someone else, hence, they don’t inspire you to take action. 
  2. Internal conflicts – there is a part of you that wants it, but also a part that doesn’t. Until you resolve it, you are literally fighting yourself.
  3. You either do not have a big enough reason or cannot see the connection to your core values or soul path to do the work necessary and overcome whatever challenges are involved.
  4. Negative beliefs, assumptions, and judgments
  5. Not knowing how to achieve these goals, who to turn to for help, the first steps to take, and not having faith that you can figure these things out as you go along.

But here, I would like to address #3 — finding the underlying reason why you want what you want especially focusing on your core values and primary life direction. This reason, which I call your ‘Why’ also relates to ‘Relevant’ in SMART goals listed below.

What are SMART goals?

SMART is an acronym for each element that needs to be in place for goal achievement:  

  • Specific (clear, concise goals writen down and described in detail),
  • Measurable (allowing you to track your progress with end date in mind ),
  • Achievable (challenging yet doable),
  • Relevant (fit in with your core values, overall life plan or purpose), and
  • Time-based (with dates for each part of the process).

To Achievable listed above, I would add that you need to BELIEVE that this goal is achievable even if no one has done it before, and you don’t have a clue yet how to do it yourself.

Setting SMART goals is commonly talked about in business circles because it takes goal setting out of the realm of fuzzy thinking into a clear action plan enhancing the likelihood of results.

A recent example of finding your WHY:

Right after Thanksgiving I took a train from Charlottesville, Virginia to New Jersey, picked up my son’s van and most essential belongings and drove about 3200 miles or 8 hours/day most days for 8 days to get them out to California in time for my son to start work at a job that he had only just gotten only a couple of weeks before. I had to hustle to schedule, organize, instruct caretakers for my farm, get animal houses cleaned, feed purchased, and everything ready, including getting my other businesses taken care of to make this happen.

Now, I should tell you that I hate driving and dislike leaving home especially when I don’t know where I am going and have to set up my own travel arrangements and accommodations along the way. I procrastinate endlessly when I have to go somewhere, usually waiting until the last moment. I worry incessantly about other people taking good care that my pets and farm animals are kept safe, well fed and sheltered appropriately, greenhouse and other plants watered, doors locked, etc. There are enough problems and emergencies that come up when I am here all day for me to tell you that these fears are based in reality.

And yet I offered to do this. Why? I had a big enough reason. I saw it as the only realistic solution that would allow my only child to start his wonderful new job on time, a job that would enhance the well-being of his entire family and fulfill their cherished dreams. And because of that reason, I put everything aside and got it done.

As a hypnotherapist, I work with a lot of smokers. Most important to their success is in having them identify their ‘why’. What do they want more than a cigarette? No one stops smoking because it is a good or healthy thing to do, or it costs too much, or other people are nagging them. No one stops even if doctors tell them that they have to stop. Lots of people continue to smoke after heart attacks, getting emphysema or cancer.  They only stop when they want something MORE.  

When your reason is clear and big enough, anything is possible. You will amaze yourself and others with what you can do. 

So as you look at your year ahead and what you would like to see happen this year, ask yourself

What is my ‘Why’?

 

Once you know that, then ask

And if it could work, how would it work?

 

Copyright 1/2019 by Roxanne Louise. However, this article may be shared in other free online sources only if this copyright notice and links to http://www.roxannelouise.com and http://unlimitedpotentialhealingcenter.com are included with the content.

 

 

ILLNESS as CHOICE ?

Santa Cruz Vending 7:16 copy

TO BE OR NOT TO BE — SICK 

Putting forth the premise that illness is a choice may sound harsh. But think about it this way: Long before you get sick, you are entrenched in hundreds of little habits–habits of eating, exercise, work, lifestyle, smoking, drinking, and habits of how you handle stress, conflict and negative emotions. Even how you think is largely a matter of habit. And because thoughts determine emotions, emotional states and attitude are a result of habits of mind.

Choices become habits, and habits become destiny

All habits come about through choice–little decisions made again and again, perhaps multiple times daily until they become automatic and start to run your life. Thoughts are a choice as are attitude, beliefs, judgments, and decisions about how to interpret events and experiences.

Consequences

There are consequences to your choices, consequences that include your health, mental and emotional well-being, or lack of same. However, at the time that the choices were made, you may have been unaware of those consequences or you lived in denial. After all, when you picked up your first cigarette were you really paying attention to the health risks? Did you think you could outrun the bullet, and that the health warnings didn’t apply to you? Did you just figure on having just a few, and quitting tomorrow? Were you bargaining, “please, God, just let me have this one ___ (cigarette/drink/ice cream sunday) and then I’ll stop and be good!

Now, years later you may become aware that it has come time to pay the piper. What do you do when you don’t like the negative consequences of your choices? How do you unravel bad habits, bad decisions, limiting beliefs or judgments for which you are now paying dearly?

Making different choices

Healing requires change, and change can be scary.

If a health problem is a result of long standing habits and patterns, healing will always require changing those habits and patterns. The necessary changes may be all pervasive, even drastic, and can be just as scary as the illness itself.  Carolyn Myss in Why People Don’t Heal and How They Can, says that

“many of us are almost as afraid of healing as we are of illness.”2 

Even though a person may be aware of the risks, and their doctor may have recommended dietary, habit or lifestyle changes over the years, only when there is a clear cause and effect relationship of certain habits and choices with the negative consequences do most people begin to make even the smallest, yet alone big changes, that may be necessary. This follows the Law of Inertia, a body at rest tends to stay at rest, and a body in motion tends to stay in motion. It takes more energy to shift direction than to continue to do what you have always done.

How committed are you to heal?

Are you willing to do whatever it takes? And if you aren’t, can we then say that you are choosing to remain sick?

Myss asks the following:

If healing required moving to another part of the country, changing your attitudes toward others and yourself, changing all your physical habits, such as diet and exercise, being alone for a long period of time, or going on a retreat to confront your shadow, experiencing illness as a way of healing mentally, emotionally and spiritually, or losing everything familiar to you — home, spouse, job–would you do it?3

John Harrison, MD, in Love Your Disease–It’s Keeping You Healthy says that

Anybody prepared to make fearless decisions in their best interests will avoid all major illness and most minor ones as well.”

Illness provides benefits called secondary gains

There may be positive payoffs to being sick. For example, illness may get you out of a job, activity, situation, relationship, or a responsibility that you hate. It can provide an excuse not to do, or not to go where you don’t want, or to do something that you do, for example, to stay home and watch television. It may provide financial awards, temporary or ongoing income, medical benefits, and time off from work. [See article “Secondary Gain – a Gain from Pain”

Illness may get people off your back. It may provide an excuse, and special considerations or privileges such as handicapped parking. It may allow you to avoid responsibility for yourself or others. It may cast the die–letting the disease or condition make a decision for you when you are too indecisive or weak to do it on your own.

Illness may pull a family or relationship together, or provide a way to check on the feelings of others. It may let others know that you need them, providing them with an important role, and helping them to feel good about themself for helping you. Illness can be a way to get people to come to visit, and to obtain desired attention, emotional assistance, concern, sympathy, demonstrations of caring or love. It can be a way to get people to do things for you, even getting waited on hand and foot as in hospitalization.

Finally, a health problem can be a form of self-punishment, a way to atone or pay yourself back for guilty thoughts, feelings, behavior. As Myss says, 

Illness can…become a powerful way to get attention you might not otherwise receive”, and “as a form of leverage, illness can seem almost attractive.”

Benefits to illness can be secondary or primary to the condition. They can be conscious or unconscious (below the level of awareness). As in which came first, the chicken or the egg, did the person get sick in order to get his needs met? Or did he get sick as a result of bad habits or some other reason, and then notice that there were some payoffs in being ill?

Harrison says that

The person is needy, rather than sick….People get ill to get what they want… People do not get what they want…so they become ill.”5

Basic needs,  such as attention, solitude, caring, must be met one way or the other. And if illness is providing those needs, the person must feel secure in meeting those same needs, just as easily as before, but now in a healthy, constructive way. Otherwise, he will resist getting well, or he will get sick again to get his needs met.

To break the negative cycle, both the pain of the illness needs to be great enough for the person to be motivated to change, and the person must have hope that making changes will make a positive difference in their health. Without hope or positive expectancy, why bother to even try?

Harrison further states that

“Disease is both self-created and self-cured…. Illness is the physical and psychological result of unresolved needs, not a malfunction of a machine caused by unknown or external factors….We give ourselves illnesses in order to ‘take care of ourselves’ psychologically.”

Harrison and Stephen Parkhill, author of Answer Cancer, refer to an unspoken contract between doctor and patient that says the following. The doctor, in exchange for money, will remove unpleasant symptoms for the patient without upsetting the patient’s chosen lifestyle or habits, attitudes or feelings, judgments or beliefs. The doctor will participate in the illusion that the patient is a victim and not responsible for either the disease or its removal and return to health. The doctor will take over responsibility for the patient’s health and all decisions relevant to his health care.

Harrison puts it this way:

“I have consulted you to have my need recognized, my suffering validated, my pain removed and my disease retained. In return, I will support you financially and give you status commensurate with the powers I ask you to exercise.”6 

As Harrison further states,

“It’s this need to be taken care of by people more powerful than ourselves that leads us into taking some decisions that are damaging to us in the long term.”

This agreement between doctor and patient may eradicate symptoms, but miss the cure. It has all the dysfunctional psychodynamics of the Victim-Rescuer-Persecutor Triangle7 –the patient being the Victim, the doctor/therapist being the Rescuer, and the disease/condition being the Persecutor. Roles can switch if compliance in the game is unsatisfactory. Patients need to get out of the game and take back responsibility for their illness, and take back their power to heal.

Parkhill believes that cancer is created because of an unconscious need for self-mutilation and self-punishment. He believes that ailments in general come from an unconscious need for self-punishment, self-mutilation, or limitation. While I think it is more to it than this, I do agree with his belief that guilt, blame, criticism, fears, such as the fear of abandonment, or the fear of not surviving because essential needs are not well met, set up later illness. And to this list, I would add many other emotions and internal conflicts could be involved depending upon the illness and where it is located. 

Unraveling Bad Choices

Postulating that illness is a choice, even if it is an unconscious one, implies that there is a different choice or choices that can be made that will leading to a different outcome–one of potential health, vitality, and overall well-being. Once clear about the negative consequences of what you have been doing in diet, lifestyle, holding onto negative emtions, etc., you may be motivated to change.

Make a commitment to take positive action, start with making the most obvious and the most doable changes, and the changes most likely to make the most difference.

There are many ways of tackling this.

Self-hypnosis really helps to focus on priorities, increase motivation to do what you need to do, change negative thinking, and to release stress. Thought Stopping and Switching is a powerful tool to mental and, therefore, emotional control. Emotional Freedom Technique, Emotion Code, and Tapas Acupressure Technique also are invaluable in releasing stress, self-sabotage, and healing issues. Hypnosis, Neural Linguistic Programming, dowsing, my own Infinite Intelligence Process [see here], are all powerful in both locating and resolving issues.

Through hypnosis or Time Line Therapy you can go back in time to a choice point and make a healthier, more constructive choice that leads to health. I like the unconscious healing modality taught to me by A.L Ward, but those of other hypnosis mentors such as E. Arthur Winkler or Walter Sichort and his protege James Ramey, did something similar.

Then, you can imagine traveling into the future to a time when the problem has been satisfactorily resolved, find out how that was done, and bring that solution back to the present moment along with the resources to do it. This is called Future Pace, or Crystal Ball, or Magic Wand — all hypnosis and NLP techniques.

Or again with hypnosis, you can imagine going into a parallel universe in order to change direction to an alternate reality more of your liking. Go the station platform and change trains.

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FOOTNOTES:

1. First published in 5/2007

2. Why People Don’t Heal and How They Can, page i x.

3. Ibid, page 138-139.

4. John Harrison, M.D., Love Your Disease, page 51

5. page 46-7

6. Love Your Disease, page 59

7. The Victim-Rescuer-Persecutor Triangle is typically seen with alcoholics, drug addicts, gamblers, and many of the chronically ill. The Victim uses his problem to manipulate and control others into taking over responsibility for him, bailing him out of problems, and meeting his emotional and perhaps financial needs. The Rescuer initially feels good to be of help, but later comes to feel as if he, himself, is being victimized by the very person he is trying to help, who has takes on the role of Persecutor. Rescuers are caught in this trap because they do not feel good about themselves unless they are helping those they consider more unfortunate than they. Most people in the helping profession as well as nurses and others in the healing arts start out as Rescuers. Hence, they are vulnerable to being used and abused by others. Awareness helps, but the biggest cure for this is high self-esteem and healthy boundaries.

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“Illness as Choice ?” Copyright 7/2015 and expanded ad rewritten 6/2018 as “What if illness was a choice?” by Roxanne Louise. However, this article may be shared in other free online sources only if this copyright notice and link to http://www.roxannelouise.com and http://unlimitedpotentialhealingcenter.com are included with the content.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: see our main website: http://www.roxannelouise.com or call 434-263-4337